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December 15,2020

by Grace Banks

On Read with Liv Little

Liv Little reflects on the 2020 that left us all on read.

The beginning of this year? I feel like I can't even remember what life was like. I do remember being in Japan early in the year living my best life and having the most amazing time. Then the world changed. We all started to realise the impact this was going to have on people's health, on businesses, mental health and life as we know it. It wasn’t how anyone thought this year was going to turn out. 

I think it's also forced us to think about new ways to do things. And I think there was a lot more problem solving and solution driven ideas that came out of this crisis that kind of showed us that we could connect globally and remotely. It's been quite transformative I think on that level.

I'm someone that gets a lot of my energy from people. At the beginning of lockdown I was worried, “Oh, my gosh, me and my partner in one house, in a tiny flat. sharing space. Trying to work, live, love. cohabit, all of this stuff. What will it be like?”. But I think we kind of got into our own little rhythm. And we've also made decisions about how we want to live and are going to live moving forward in terms of space, location, and all of that sort of stuff. 

I’m a born and bred Londoner, I grew up in the 2000s in London. But the city has changed and I’ve decided to move. I think we live on top of each other in this city and so much of the way that we choose where we're going to live, or how where we’re going to live is in proximity to how quick we can get to work, how easy we can get to work. Now the way we’re working has changed, we've made a decision to kind of shift where and how we live, and that might not be inside a city. As much as I’m a London girl, l have huge love and have gotten a lot of my energy from nature. When I was really young, we'd go camping in the Peak District, Lake District and it’s just one of the most beautiful places that holds real significance for my family. So I think, yeah, it's just, it's obvious to me that this isn't necessarily the space or the place that I should be living in to have a happy existence. 

I think I'm quite cynical when it comes to the political situation here. I don't think I necessarily would have expected for there to be any more humanity shown by the current government that we have. And I think this situation has absolutely exposed inequalities in a new light. It’s a very bleak thing to say, but I don't feel particularly hopeful that there will be serious change without people campaigning. I don't think that I don't think that they care about poor people, I don't think that they care much about marginalised people. But you know, hopefully, the next government will not be the same government that we have now. 

I think a lot of the conversations that started to happen are conversations that we as black people have been having for a long time. I think maybe it was the first time it felt as though people from outside of that demographic were also starting to engage in this conversation. So whether they were actually acting on it, or just putting statements out on social media and saying that we're going to change but don't really change is another thing. It's now about seeing what the legacy of those conversations are actually tangibly going to look like.

I was speaking to one of my friends and she told me that Black History Month and then International Women's month are her two biggest earners. You can't programme black content. You can’t just frame that conversation for one month. You have to offer the platform and support and work with black filmmakers, writers, producers, storytellers comedians, all year round because we exist all year round.

I think there's so much that needs to change in regards to how we report on culture and who is given the voice and the platform to speak about certain issues. With gal-dem we’re really trying to shift how the most important issues are reported on. I'm moving from being CEO of gal-dem to president of the board, which is just mad and wonderful after five years. Last week was my final week as CEO and it feels right. It feels good. II think it's time for someone to step in and take everything we’ve done in a new direction.

Liv Little is co-founder of gal-dem magazine and president of the board.

Watch the full IGTV interview here.

LivLittle JournalPortraitLivLittle Journal Quote

December 15,2020

by Grace Banks

On Read with Liv Little

Liv Little reflects on the 2020 that left us all on read.

The beginning of this year? I feel like I can't even remember what life was like. I do remember being in Japan early in the year living my best life and having the most amazing time. Then the world changed. We all started to realise the impact this was going to have on people's health, on businesses, mental health and life as we know it. It wasn’t how anyone thought this year was going to turn out. 

I think it's also forced us to think about new ways to do things. And I think there was a lot more problem solving and solution driven ideas that came out of this crisis that kind of showed us that we could connect globally and remotely. It's been quite transformative I think on that level.

I'm someone that gets a lot of my energy from people. At the beginning of lockdown I was worried, “Oh, my gosh, me and my partner in one house, in a tiny flat. sharing space. Trying to work, live, love. cohabit, all of this stuff. What will it be like?”. But I think we kind of got into our own little rhythm. And we've also made decisions about how we want to live and are going to live moving forward in terms of space, location, and all of that sort of stuff. 

I’m a born and bred Londoner, I grew up in the 2000s in London. But the city has changed and I’ve decided to move. I think we live on top of each other in this city and so much of the way that we choose where we're going to live, or how where we’re going to live is in proximity to how quick we can get to work, how easy we can get to work. Now the way we’re working has changed, we've made a decision to kind of shift where and how we live, and that might not be inside a city. As much as I’m a London girl, l have huge love and have gotten a lot of my energy from nature. When I was really young, we'd go camping in the Peak District, Lake District and it’s just one of the most beautiful places that holds real significance for my family. So I think, yeah, it's just, it's obvious to me that this isn't necessarily the space or the place that I should be living in to have a happy existence. 

I think I'm quite cynical when it comes to the political situation here. I don't think I necessarily would have expected for there to be any more humanity shown by the current government that we have. And I think this situation has absolutely exposed inequalities in a new light. It’s a very bleak thing to say, but I don't feel particularly hopeful that there will be serious change without people campaigning. I don't think that I don't think that they care about poor people, I don't think that they care much about marginalised people. But you know, hopefully, the next government will not be the same government that we have now. 

I think a lot of the conversations that started to happen are conversations that we as black people have been having for a long time. I think maybe it was the first time it felt as though people from outside of that demographic were also starting to engage in this conversation. So whether they were actually acting on it, or just putting statements out on social media and saying that we're going to change but don't really change is another thing. It's now about seeing what the legacy of those conversations are actually tangibly going to look like.

I was speaking to one of my friends and she told me that Black History Month and then International Women's month are her two biggest earners. You can't programme black content. You can’t just frame that conversation for one month. You have to offer the platform and support and work with black filmmakers, writers, producers, storytellers comedians, all year round because we exist all year round.

I think there's so much that needs to change in regards to how we report on culture and who is given the voice and the platform to speak about certain issues. With gal-dem we’re really trying to shift how the most important issues are reported on. I'm moving from being CEO of gal-dem to president of the board, which is just mad and wonderful after five years. Last week was my final week as CEO and it feels right. It feels good. II think it's time for someone to step in and take everything we’ve done in a new direction.

Liv Little is co-founder of gal-dem magazine and president of the board.

Watch the full IGTV interview here.

LivLittle JournalPortraitLivLittle Journal Quote