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March 16,2020

by Efren Poveda Garcia

Acquiesce

We know this can be a frightening time for many, a boring time for others and, of course, a source of dilemmas of different kinds. That is why we would like to shed a constructive light on this whole situation and see it as an opportunity to rethink ourselves and the ways in which we organise.

Absolutely understandable desires for the passing of this crisis are being expressed throughout the social media, desires that we endorse without any doubt. However, there are also several questions on our minds, the first one being “Which is the normality we want to return to?” Or, in other words, “Is hoping for the coronavirus to pass the only or the main thing to hope for at the moment?” Our answer is no.

Conceiving our current situation as an isolated case might be a mistake. As environmental change advances, the expansion of illnesses and infections, old and new (or old enough to be new: Scientists have been warning about the ancient bacteria and viruses that could be liberated by the melting of permafrost soils) is a possibility to take into serious consideration. The corona-crisis, therefore, could be the first of many world-level public health emergencies, the distance in time between which would progressively decrease.

Image by Monica Trinidad

At the same time, environmental emergencies such as ocean pollution and the recent fires in the Amazon and Australia have awoken many of us to the always present, dramatically augmenting and lately acknowledged interdependence of all humans on Earth. Despite Jair Bolsonaro’s claims, the loss of rainforest areas in Brazil is a matter of planetary-level (please allow us to abstain from using the word international for now) collective concern.

We want to use the corona-crisis as a glimpse of what might come and a warning regarding our individualistic dispositions and reactions. And no, we are not being defeatists with all of this. On the contrary, we think that a correct analysis of the situation will lead us to necessary conclusions that will be good for all.

Not just good in the face of adversity, but good in a historical, human sense. This is an opportunity to foster the kind of moral attitudes that, despite actual behaviours, most of us could agree on if we didn’t live in a systemically preserved estate of infantilisation.

We don’t need a universal, empathy-based ethics just because of what’s to come. We don’t need institutions to guarantee that we listen to each other, to ensure inclusive collective thinking and decision making only because of what’s to come. We need these things due to our common humanity.

Kolkata1

The normality we expect once the coronavirus is defeated is one of emotional maturity, human solidarity, caring relationships instead of essentially monetised relationships and democratic self-organisation. For that, we will have to face the alluded fact that we are being kept infantilised, as the selfishness and absurdity of certain behaviours is proving. An example: People emptying supermarket shelves to buy items in
amounts they can’t possibly need, and doing it out of fear of the personal consequences of an illness that they themselves are contributing to expand by bursting en masse into grocery stores. This is why we can almost relate to the mistakes of certain governments in waiting too long to declare the state of emergency. For what can you expect from populations raised to think in terms of me, myself and I if not irresponsibility and chaos? It almost seems logical to wait as much as possible until you can avoid certain activities and restrict basic liberties through justifiable prohibition.

But before coronavirus is defeated, we would like to contribute to the things we expect for the future. That is why we want to express our disagreement with policies that desert the most vulnerable just because they are not powerful enough nor enough represented (our non-wealthy elders and people with chronic conditions), just like the UK’s Prime Minister has decided to do. That is also why we reject the nationalist ideas some are trying to reinforce by blaming globalisation.

This is the moment to realise how big our small acts of small persons are for others, to realise that humanity is like a living organism where, if most cells don’t contribute to the functioning of the whole system, all cells will perish. Let us all internalise contribution to the whole as a virtue. Let us take advantage of this abnormal situation to
create a new normality, to teach one another that new normality, to collectively
help each other to collectively leave behind both our individual and collective
immaturities
.

We encourage the Miista community to join us in adopting measures to prevent unnecessary pain, to take care of each other. Let us think twice before we go shopping, or before we go to the gym. Let us think twice before we leave home, unless we go out to help or bring what they need to the most vulnerable. Home seclusion, together with thorough hygiene, are now the responsible things to do. Demanding adequate prevention and medical attention from neglectful governments, too. And holding politicians accountable for inaction.

Not each of us for herself, but each of us together for everybody. It is time to realise that we can bring about a future of mutual help, cooperation, global collectivity and, consequently, brimming with creativity.

Cooperation by Nick Youngson CC BY-SA 3.0 Alpha Stock Images

March 16,2020

by Efren Poveda Garcia

Acquiesce

We know this can be a frightening time for many, a boring time for others and, of course, a source of dilemmas of different kinds. That is why we would like to shed a constructive light on this whole situation and see it as an opportunity to rethink ourselves and the ways in which we organise.

Absolutely understandable desires for the passing of this crisis are being expressed throughout the social media, desires that we endorse without any doubt. However, there are also several questions on our minds, the first one being “Which is the normality we want to return to?” Or, in other words, “Is hoping for the coronavirus to pass the only or the main thing to hope for at the moment?” Our answer is no.

Conceiving our current situation as an isolated case might be a mistake. As environmental change advances, the expansion of illnesses and infections, old and new (or old enough to be new: Scientists have been warning about the ancient bacteria and viruses that could be liberated by the melting of permafrost soils) is a possibility to take into serious consideration. The corona-crisis, therefore, could be the first of many world-level public health emergencies, the distance in time between which would progressively decrease.

Image by Monica Trinidad

At the same time, environmental emergencies such as ocean pollution and the recent fires in the Amazon and Australia have awoken many of us to the always present, dramatically augmenting and lately acknowledged interdependence of all humans on Earth. Despite Jair Bolsonaro’s claims, the loss of rainforest areas in Brazil is a matter of planetary-level (please allow us to abstain from using the word international for now) collective concern.

We want to use the corona-crisis as a glimpse of what might come and a warning regarding our individualistic dispositions and reactions. And no, we are not being defeatists with all of this. On the contrary, we think that a correct analysis of the situation will lead us to necessary conclusions that will be good for all.

Not just good in the face of adversity, but good in a historical, human sense. This is an opportunity to foster the kind of moral attitudes that, despite actual behaviours, most of us could agree on if we didn’t live in a systemically preserved estate of infantilisation.

We don’t need a universal, empathy-based ethics just because of what’s to come. We don’t need institutions to guarantee that we listen to each other, to ensure inclusive collective thinking and decision making only because of what’s to come. We need these things due to our common humanity.

Kolkata1

The normality we expect once the coronavirus is defeated is one of emotional maturity, human solidarity, caring relationships instead of essentially monetised relationships and democratic self-organisation. For that, we will have to face the alluded fact that we are being kept infantilised, as the selfishness and absurdity of certain behaviours is proving. An example: People emptying supermarket shelves to buy items in
amounts they can’t possibly need, and doing it out of fear of the personal consequences of an illness that they themselves are contributing to expand by bursting en masse into grocery stores. This is why we can almost relate to the mistakes of certain governments in waiting too long to declare the state of emergency. For what can you expect from populations raised to think in terms of me, myself and I if not irresponsibility and chaos? It almost seems logical to wait as much as possible until you can avoid certain activities and restrict basic liberties through justifiable prohibition.

But before coronavirus is defeated, we would like to contribute to the things we expect for the future. That is why we want to express our disagreement with policies that desert the most vulnerable just because they are not powerful enough nor enough represented (our non-wealthy elders and people with chronic conditions), just like the UK’s Prime Minister has decided to do. That is also why we reject the nationalist ideas some are trying to reinforce by blaming globalisation.

This is the moment to realise how big our small acts of small persons are for others, to realise that humanity is like a living organism where, if most cells don’t contribute to the functioning of the whole system, all cells will perish. Let us all internalise contribution to the whole as a virtue. Let us take advantage of this abnormal situation to
create a new normality, to teach one another that new normality, to collectively
help each other to collectively leave behind both our individual and collective
immaturities
.

We encourage the Miista community to join us in adopting measures to prevent unnecessary pain, to take care of each other. Let us think twice before we go shopping, or before we go to the gym. Let us think twice before we leave home, unless we go out to help or bring what they need to the most vulnerable. Home seclusion, together with thorough hygiene, are now the responsible things to do. Demanding adequate prevention and medical attention from neglectful governments, too. And holding politicians accountable for inaction.

Not each of us for herself, but each of us together for everybody. It is time to realise that we can bring about a future of mutual help, cooperation, global collectivity and, consequently, brimming with creativity.

Cooperation by Nick Youngson CC BY-SA 3.0 Alpha Stock Images