Choose a different region if you want to see the content for your location and shop online. We recommend:

Your cart

Oh no, your cart is empty

December 14,2020

by Grace Banks

On Read with Jess Maybury

Jess Maybury reflects on the 2020 that left us all on read.

A lot of inequalities were exposed in the fashion industry this year. And I really noticed how it just got to the stage where the various Instagram posts from brands and individuals, well, it was essentially virtue signalling. It didn’t make much sense to me. Because you post something on Instagram that only your friends see and actually, it isn't changing anything. I think a more valuable thing people can do is donate money and help local charities with campaigning. Like a lot of my friends who do work within the charity sector, they don't post any of this stuff on Instagram, because, what's the point? It's not really altering somebody's life. A lot of people wanted to look like a bit of a white saviour. 

Before lockdown, I was really busy, I was working a lot. So when everyone was grounded it was a shock to the system. I decided to go and stay with my mum outside of London. So it was kind of an interesting period of my life feeling like a teenager again, but also being more of an adult, making some big life decisions that I'm grateful for now.

Within my industry, in 2021, I’d like to see a lot more inclusivity. As far as modelling goes, I think things are changing. There are a lot more girls now who are more my size and bigger. Which basically just means people who will eat burgers and have a metabolism of somebody who's a bit older and not a teenager! I see it as an asset that I’m older. I’m very happy about it, I think I care a lot less. And I choose what I want to care about. How much energy I want to put into something. I mean, it sounds weird saying an older model. I'm 27!

How I view beauty and how people in the fashion industry probably view beauty is very, very different. I can find any single person in the world beautiful. I can understand the beauty in someone, but in fashion it can be very sterile. I think my slightly different viewpoint on all that comes from my parents. I grew up in a very creative environment. My parents worked in interiors and the work they did trickled down into my life now, and how me and my sister Reba’s style and taste evolved.

Working in the fashion industry, you obviously realise there are issues with fast fashion and the environment, and the knock on effect of how these clothes are produced. Whether it's the amount of waste created or air pollution. So yeah, the problem with fast fashion and how it’s affecting the environment is something that needs to be addressed. I’ve always bought a lot of my stuff second hand and vintage anyway. I go to Ebay, and I’ve gotten pretty good at finding stuff there. I don’t really spend much money on clothes.

Just the concept of a new year feels quite strange at the moment. But I hope everyone can have more fun and have some physical, emotional and psychological freedoms that we might not necessarily have had in 2020. I would like a bit more lightness!

Jess Maybury is a model based in London.

Watch the full IGTV interview here.

JessM JournalQuoteJessM JournalPortrait

December 14,2020

by Grace Banks

On Read with Jess Maybury

Jess Maybury reflects on the 2020 that left us all on read.

A lot of inequalities were exposed in the fashion industry this year. And I really noticed how it just got to the stage where the various Instagram posts from brands and individuals, well, it was essentially virtue signalling. It didn’t make much sense to me. Because you post something on Instagram that only your friends see and actually, it isn't changing anything. I think a more valuable thing people can do is donate money and help local charities with campaigning. Like a lot of my friends who do work within the charity sector, they don't post any of this stuff on Instagram, because, what's the point? It's not really altering somebody's life. A lot of people wanted to look like a bit of a white saviour. 

Before lockdown, I was really busy, I was working a lot. So when everyone was grounded it was a shock to the system. I decided to go and stay with my mum outside of London. So it was kind of an interesting period of my life feeling like a teenager again, but also being more of an adult, making some big life decisions that I'm grateful for now.

Within my industry, in 2021, I’d like to see a lot more inclusivity. As far as modelling goes, I think things are changing. There are a lot more girls now who are more my size and bigger. Which basically just means people who will eat burgers and have a metabolism of somebody who's a bit older and not a teenager! I see it as an asset that I’m older. I’m very happy about it, I think I care a lot less. And I choose what I want to care about. How much energy I want to put into something. I mean, it sounds weird saying an older model. I'm 27!

How I view beauty and how people in the fashion industry probably view beauty is very, very different. I can find any single person in the world beautiful. I can understand the beauty in someone, but in fashion it can be very sterile. I think my slightly different viewpoint on all that comes from my parents. I grew up in a very creative environment. My parents worked in interiors and the work they did trickled down into my life now, and how me and my sister Reba’s style and taste evolved.

Working in the fashion industry, you obviously realise there are issues with fast fashion and the environment, and the knock on effect of how these clothes are produced. Whether it's the amount of waste created or air pollution. So yeah, the problem with fast fashion and how it’s affecting the environment is something that needs to be addressed. I’ve always bought a lot of my stuff second hand and vintage anyway. I go to Ebay, and I’ve gotten pretty good at finding stuff there. I don’t really spend much money on clothes.

Just the concept of a new year feels quite strange at the moment. But I hope everyone can have more fun and have some physical, emotional and psychological freedoms that we might not necessarily have had in 2020. I would like a bit more lightness!

Jess Maybury is a model based in London.

Watch the full IGTV interview here.

JessM JournalQuoteJessM JournalPortrait