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May 04,2020

by Jack Bradley-Adams

Who are the modern-day Superheroes?

Growing up I used to idolise Superheroes. I was obsessed with the idea that somebody could live a normal, mundane life and be completely camouflaged into society by day- then a lightning-quick costume change (so quick that it would leave any drag queen in complete awe) before taking to the streets and fighting off a gang of 50 crooks, diverting a meteor on course to crash into Earth and saving the President from lizard people, born in the sewers of a Nuclear Energy Plant- all before bedtime. That’s quite the commendable work/play balance, I must admit.

I used to envy Spiderman’s strength, agility and I would often fantasize about how having my own spidey-senses would benefit my life as a 7-year-old. Or Mystique’s ability to shapeshift and change her appearance at will- regular exercise and a balanced diet works but shapeshifting gets IMMEDIATE results. Or even Catwoman’s ability to…. bore us to tears? (sorry Halle Berry- not your best work, but you looked sensational).

Catwoman Nurse

But what qualities really make up a Superhero? Sure a flawless costume, green screen, extensive PR tour and Hollywood budget help, but who does this benefit? As I’ve gotten older I’ve found that the traits that really define a Superhero are qualities such as selflessness, compassion, an adaptability under pressure and an innate desire to help others. The qualities demonstrated by our incredible health services all over the world, particularly in the face of the current global crisis.

The true Superheroes in society are already walking among us and living in our local communities. It is very humbling to think that every day without knowing it, we used to pass so many faces as we commute to our office in East London, and that unbeknownst to us, we are in the company of such inspiring people, willing to risk their own health and safety for the sake of strangers. 

It has been hard for us to see the lack of support and funding for the NHS from our own government. It is deeply saddening to now be accustomed to regularly see pleas from our Healthcare professionals on social media for more access to PPE and testing. The UK is currently testing less than 10,000 a day, compared to 500,000 a week in Germany. 

At Miista we have always strived to use collaboration as a tool to showcase the very best of human interaction and celebrate it through different mediums. This time we wanted to do something extra special.

Just a short walk away from where our office is based in East London is the incredible Royal London Hospital. The Hospital was founded in 1740, built-in Whitechapel where it became the Capitol’s first Hospital to be based in the East of the city. It is now part of Barts Health NHS Trust, which is made up of 5 Hospitals and a team of 16,000 staff, making it the largest NHS Trust in the United Kingdom, and one of the largest in Europe. 

screen-shot-2018-03-25-at-23-56-31 orig

I recently caught up with Lidia, a 30-year-old nurse from Barcelona working in Paediatric Intensive Care at the Royal London Hospital, which is currently operating as an Intensive Care Unit for patients that have tested positive for COVID-19. 

Jack: “Hi Lidia! Thank you so much for taking the time out of your busy schedule to talk with me! I’d like to start by hearing about your last shift, what kind of things are you seeing at the Hospital and how does this differ from your typical working conditions?”

Lidia: “I will be very honest with you, it’s not like a few months ago. When we are allocated where we will be working that day, the ritual starts. It’s all about long sleeve gown, super tight face masks, surgical cap, tight visor and pairs of gloves. You end up sweating as if you were in the desert. Once we are gowned up we take a deep breath and we enter the room. In the past, before this pandemic started we used to look after one patient in intensive care (1:1). Nowadays we look after two (1:2) but this number can change if the situation deteriorates.” 

“We all feel tired, we work under pressure and I’m not going to lie to you saying that we are not terribly scared. We all suffer for the people around us; family, children, friends. We have to avoid seeing them these days as it’s very risky. We could easily carry the virus without having any symptoms and pass it on...Fortunately I can say I have had an amazing team around me. I have never felt like I was alone.”

Jack: “So effectively your individual workload has now doubled? That must be exhausting! But I’m glad to hear that you are being treated and have a great support system around you! I imagine it makes a big difference to your time at work. How many people work in your team?” 

Lidia: “Yes, now it’s more challenging and most of the patients with covid19 are very sick and very unstable, unpredictable. At the Hospital there are 4 intensive care units. On my unit, we are a team of approximately 60. We used to have 18 beds, now 30.”

Jack: “So again almost double, it must be very intense! Amongst all of the different challenges you and your team are facing at the moment, what would you say is the biggest challenge?”

Lidia: “Very intense! My biggest challenge is not to get infected and continue to protect the most vulnerable.”

Jack: “I wanted to ask actually, are you concerned about your own safety and the risk of infection?

And do you think the NHS is being provided with the proper PPE and access to testing that is required?”

Lidia: “Yes. If I get infected I have to self isolate for a week, if everything goes well and I don’t deteriorate. And who’s going to work for me? Who’s going to look after those patients? 

There are just not enough intensive care nurses in London to face this pandemic.”

“And of course we are all very concerned as this disease can affect everyone. No matter what age. We are all at risk.”

“Our supply of PPE is very scarce and we can only access testing if we have been displaying  symptoms.”

Lidia NHS

Jack:  “What I find most amazing is how immediately your concern is for others and not yourself, it speaks volumes about not only yourself but all of the amazing health care professionals we are so fortunate to have.”

“I think one thing we have been quick to assume is that this disease only affects the elderly or those with underlying health issues.”

Lidia: “You are right. I think people think that this disease only affects older people and it’s not true. I have looked after patients of 25 years of age, incredibly sick, intubated and sedated with high oxygen requirements. This disease is something that puts each and every one of us at risk.”

Jack: “That can’t be something that is easy to face, how do you cope with the mental and emotional exhaustion? What have you found helps you deal with the pressure?”

Lidia: “When I’m not at work I try to rest as much as I can, I work out at home or go for a walk to clear the mind. Cooking helps me with stress and listening to music too. I’m not that good at doing yoga or meditation but I totally recommend it!”

Jack: “How have you found the response to this Pandemic from the general public and businesses?”

Lidia: “When we come to work and sit in the handover office and we are amazed by the amount of different food and treats that people donate, some restaurants and big food brands bring us lots of fresh meals daily. We also get hand creams for free, since we wash our hands 3837389 times daily, haha.”

“I think most of the people are taking it seriously but others are being a little selfish...yesterday when I was on my way to the supermarket I saw a group of teenagers sitting in the park like nothing at all has changed. It’s sunny I get it but we have to think about others and protect them. We cannot overload the hospitals simply because we haven’t been able to follow the rules”

Jack: “I wanted to ask actually, what would your message be to those being told to self-isolate at the moment?”

Lidia:  “Stay home for you, for your family, for your friends. Now love them in the distance, miss them, so that one day, when all this is over, hugs will be the best thing that will happen to you since this virus appeared in our lives.”

Jack: “That’s such a beautiful message! Thank you so, so much for your time Lidia, it has been very humbling to hear about your work and experiences.”

Lidia: “Thank you Jack!”

03067c00-5e9b-40bf-93b0-e13d473b246a

At Miista we have been speaking about the ways we can do something to show our appreciation for the amazing healthcare professionals in our local community. We want to make a difference to their day, something that offers a short distraction from the pressure and stress they are facing and help put a smile on their face. That’s why we are gifting the healthcare professionals working on the ICU wards at the Royal London Hospital 100 pairs of our shoes, as a way of saying THANK YOU for the incredible work they do.

They are our modern-day superheroes, and we would be lost without them.

If you would like to donate to The Royal Hospital London, then please see the link below to see how you can help: 

https://www.bartscharity.org.uk/get-involved/donate/donating-gifts-toys-and-games/

Lidia

May 04,2020

by Jack Bradley-Adams

Who are the modern-day Superheroes?

Growing up I used to idolise Superheroes. I was obsessed with the idea that somebody could live a normal, mundane life and be completely camouflaged into society by day- then a lightning-quick costume change (so quick that it would leave any drag queen in complete awe) before taking to the streets and fighting off a gang of 50 crooks, diverting a meteor on course to crash into Earth and saving the President from lizard people, born in the sewers of a Nuclear Energy Plant- all before bedtime. That’s quite the commendable work/play balance, I must admit.

I used to envy Spiderman’s strength, agility and I would often fantasize about how having my own spidey-senses would benefit my life as a 7-year-old. Or Mystique’s ability to shapeshift and change her appearance at will- regular exercise and a balanced diet works but shapeshifting gets IMMEDIATE results. Or even Catwoman’s ability to…. bore us to tears? (sorry Halle Berry- not your best work, but you looked sensational).

Catwoman Nurse

But what qualities really make up a Superhero? Sure a flawless costume, green screen, extensive PR tour and Hollywood budget help, but who does this benefit? As I’ve gotten older I’ve found that the traits that really define a Superhero are qualities such as selflessness, compassion, an adaptability under pressure and an innate desire to help others. The qualities demonstrated by our incredible health services all over the world, particularly in the face of the current global crisis.

The true Superheroes in society are already walking among us and living in our local communities. It is very humbling to think that every day without knowing it, we used to pass so many faces as we commute to our office in East London, and that unbeknownst to us, we are in the company of such inspiring people, willing to risk their own health and safety for the sake of strangers. 

It has been hard for us to see the lack of support and funding for the NHS from our own government. It is deeply saddening to now be accustomed to regularly see pleas from our Healthcare professionals on social media for more access to PPE and testing. The UK is currently testing less than 10,000 a day, compared to 500,000 a week in Germany. 

At Miista we have always strived to use collaboration as a tool to showcase the very best of human interaction and celebrate it through different mediums. This time we wanted to do something extra special.

Just a short walk away from where our office is based in East London is the incredible Royal London Hospital. The Hospital was founded in 1740, built-in Whitechapel where it became the Capitol’s first Hospital to be based in the East of the city. It is now part of Barts Health NHS Trust, which is made up of 5 Hospitals and a team of 16,000 staff, making it the largest NHS Trust in the United Kingdom, and one of the largest in Europe. 

screen-shot-2018-03-25-at-23-56-31 orig

I recently caught up with Lidia, a 30-year-old nurse from Barcelona working in Paediatric Intensive Care at the Royal London Hospital, which is currently operating as an Intensive Care Unit for patients that have tested positive for COVID-19. 

Jack: “Hi Lidia! Thank you so much for taking the time out of your busy schedule to talk with me! I’d like to start by hearing about your last shift, what kind of things are you seeing at the Hospital and how does this differ from your typical working conditions?”

Lidia: “I will be very honest with you, it’s not like a few months ago. When we are allocated where we will be working that day, the ritual starts. It’s all about long sleeve gown, super tight face masks, surgical cap, tight visor and pairs of gloves. You end up sweating as if you were in the desert. Once we are gowned up we take a deep breath and we enter the room. In the past, before this pandemic started we used to look after one patient in intensive care (1:1). Nowadays we look after two (1:2) but this number can change if the situation deteriorates.” 

“We all feel tired, we work under pressure and I’m not going to lie to you saying that we are not terribly scared. We all suffer for the people around us; family, children, friends. We have to avoid seeing them these days as it’s very risky. We could easily carry the virus without having any symptoms and pass it on...Fortunately I can say I have had an amazing team around me. I have never felt like I was alone.”

Jack: “So effectively your individual workload has now doubled? That must be exhausting! But I’m glad to hear that you are being treated and have a great support system around you! I imagine it makes a big difference to your time at work. How many people work in your team?” 

Lidia: “Yes, now it’s more challenging and most of the patients with covid19 are very sick and very unstable, unpredictable. At the Hospital there are 4 intensive care units. On my unit, we are a team of approximately 60. We used to have 18 beds, now 30.”

Jack: “So again almost double, it must be very intense! Amongst all of the different challenges you and your team are facing at the moment, what would you say is the biggest challenge?”

Lidia: “Very intense! My biggest challenge is not to get infected and continue to protect the most vulnerable.”

Jack: “I wanted to ask actually, are you concerned about your own safety and the risk of infection?

And do you think the NHS is being provided with the proper PPE and access to testing that is required?”

Lidia: “Yes. If I get infected I have to self isolate for a week, if everything goes well and I don’t deteriorate. And who’s going to work for me? Who’s going to look after those patients? 

There are just not enough intensive care nurses in London to face this pandemic.”

“And of course we are all very concerned as this disease can affect everyone. No matter what age. We are all at risk.”

“Our supply of PPE is very scarce and we can only access testing if we have been displaying  symptoms.”

Lidia NHS

Jack:  “What I find most amazing is how immediately your concern is for others and not yourself, it speaks volumes about not only yourself but all of the amazing health care professionals we are so fortunate to have.”

“I think one thing we have been quick to assume is that this disease only affects the elderly or those with underlying health issues.”

Lidia: “You are right. I think people think that this disease only affects older people and it’s not true. I have looked after patients of 25 years of age, incredibly sick, intubated and sedated with high oxygen requirements. This disease is something that puts each and every one of us at risk.”

Jack: “That can’t be something that is easy to face, how do you cope with the mental and emotional exhaustion? What have you found helps you deal with the pressure?”

Lidia: “When I’m not at work I try to rest as much as I can, I work out at home or go for a walk to clear the mind. Cooking helps me with stress and listening to music too. I’m not that good at doing yoga or meditation but I totally recommend it!”

Jack: “How have you found the response to this Pandemic from the general public and businesses?”

Lidia: “When we come to work and sit in the handover office and we are amazed by the amount of different food and treats that people donate, some restaurants and big food brands bring us lots of fresh meals daily. We also get hand creams for free, since we wash our hands 3837389 times daily, haha.”

“I think most of the people are taking it seriously but others are being a little selfish...yesterday when I was on my way to the supermarket I saw a group of teenagers sitting in the park like nothing at all has changed. It’s sunny I get it but we have to think about others and protect them. We cannot overload the hospitals simply because we haven’t been able to follow the rules”

Jack: “I wanted to ask actually, what would your message be to those being told to self-isolate at the moment?”

Lidia:  “Stay home for you, for your family, for your friends. Now love them in the distance, miss them, so that one day, when all this is over, hugs will be the best thing that will happen to you since this virus appeared in our lives.”

Jack: “That’s such a beautiful message! Thank you so, so much for your time Lidia, it has been very humbling to hear about your work and experiences.”

Lidia: “Thank you Jack!”

03067c00-5e9b-40bf-93b0-e13d473b246a

At Miista we have been speaking about the ways we can do something to show our appreciation for the amazing healthcare professionals in our local community. We want to make a difference to their day, something that offers a short distraction from the pressure and stress they are facing and help put a smile on their face. That’s why we are gifting the healthcare professionals working on the ICU wards at the Royal London Hospital 100 pairs of our shoes, as a way of saying THANK YOU for the incredible work they do.

They are our modern-day superheroes, and we would be lost without them.

If you would like to donate to The Royal Hospital London, then please see the link below to see how you can help: 

https://www.bartscharity.org.uk/get-involved/donate/donating-gifts-toys-and-games/

Lidia