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March 06,2020

by Alexandra Kinde

Miista Supports InfoEndometriose

Pain is something that is subjective, it is interpreted and experienced uniquely in different people. 

Pain is embedded in female existence but it is not something we should just have to simply go along with. 

Women with endometriosis are subjected to pain on an excruciating level, devastating the lives of these women and even their families. An astonishing one in ten women suffer from this disease; which is why we are supporting InfoEndometriose for International Women’s Day. We hope to help raise awareness and encourage more research to help find solutions to the disease. 

Endometriosis is the name given to the condition where the cells similar to the ones in the lining of the womb are found elsewhere in the body. Each month these cells react in the same way to those in the womb, building up and then breaking down and bleeding. Unlike the cells in the womb that leave the body as a period, these cells have no way of leaving the body. 

It is a chronic and debilitating condition that causes painful or heavy periods. It can also lead to infertility, fatigue, bowel and bladder problems.

We are donating 15% of all our sales made on the 8th of March to support InfoEndometriose. InfoEndométriose was founded in 2015 with the aim of raising awareness of this disease and to tackle the stigma around women’s health. It was built to restore women and girls confidence and to emphasize the urgency of improving the diagnosis and early treatment of endometriosis. After four years of hard work from the team at info-endometriose, they have informed us that they are pleased that mentalities towards the disease are changing. 

Last year the French government launched a national plan for endometriosis, scientific societies have put more emphasis on this disease presenting new guidelines and creating new medical training programmes. Campaigns were launched in schools for the first time in 2018 to inform pupils and school nurses. Awareness throughout all media has grown, numerous articles, televisions programmes have been specifically dedicated to endometriosis. Famous figures like Lena Dunham and Alexa Chung are now openly talking about their battles with the disease; opening up on their personal platforms. There has definitely been a real change. 

But, this isn’t enough, endometriosis still affects millions of worldwide. There needs to be more investment into research to find effective solutions. And, as InfoEndometriose have said to us, ‘in general the perception of women’s health needs to change, it is a matter of gender equality’ and we agree. 

To help raise awareness and to understand more deeply about the impact of the disease we have collaborated with some influencers and artists to share their personal stories on the disease. 

We thought we would finish this blog post with a quote taken from one of our favourite series, Fleabag, it is a perfect description of the pain that is intrinsic to our lives. 

Women are born with pain built in,” she says. “It’s our physical destiny: period pains, sore boobs, childbirth, you know. We carry it within ourselves throughout our lives, men don’t.

“They have to seek it out, they invent all these gods and demons and things just so they can feel guilty about things, which is something we do very well on our own. And then they create wars so they can feel things and touch each other and when there aren’t any wars they can play rugby.

“We have it all going on in here inside, we have pain on a cycle for years and years and years and then just when you feel you are making peace with it all, what happens? The menopause comes, the f***ing menopause comes, and it is the most wonderful f***ing thing in the world.

“And yes, your entire pelvic floor crumbles and you get f***ing hot and no one cares, but then you’re free, no longer a slave, no longer a machine with parts. You’re just a person.”

Images - Ellie Kammer

March 06,2020

by Alexandra Kinde

Miista Supports InfoEndometriose

Pain is something that is subjective, it is interpreted and experienced uniquely in different people. 

Pain is embedded in female existence but it is not something we should just have to simply go along with. 

Women with endometriosis are subjected to pain on an excruciating level, devastating the lives of these women and even their families. An astonishing one in ten women suffer from this disease; which is why we are supporting InfoEndometriose for International Women’s Day. We hope to help raise awareness and encourage more research to help find solutions to the disease. 

Endometriosis is the name given to the condition where the cells similar to the ones in the lining of the womb are found elsewhere in the body. Each month these cells react in the same way to those in the womb, building up and then breaking down and bleeding. Unlike the cells in the womb that leave the body as a period, these cells have no way of leaving the body. 

It is a chronic and debilitating condition that causes painful or heavy periods. It can also lead to infertility, fatigue, bowel and bladder problems.

We are donating 15% of all our sales made on the 8th of March to support InfoEndometriose. InfoEndométriose was founded in 2015 with the aim of raising awareness of this disease and to tackle the stigma around women’s health. It was built to restore women and girls confidence and to emphasize the urgency of improving the diagnosis and early treatment of endometriosis. After four years of hard work from the team at info-endometriose, they have informed us that they are pleased that mentalities towards the disease are changing. 

Last year the French government launched a national plan for endometriosis, scientific societies have put more emphasis on this disease presenting new guidelines and creating new medical training programmes. Campaigns were launched in schools for the first time in 2018 to inform pupils and school nurses. Awareness throughout all media has grown, numerous articles, televisions programmes have been specifically dedicated to endometriosis. Famous figures like Lena Dunham and Alexa Chung are now openly talking about their battles with the disease; opening up on their personal platforms. There has definitely been a real change. 

But, this isn’t enough, endometriosis still affects millions of worldwide. There needs to be more investment into research to find effective solutions. And, as InfoEndometriose have said to us, ‘in general the perception of women’s health needs to change, it is a matter of gender equality’ and we agree. 

To help raise awareness and to understand more deeply about the impact of the disease we have collaborated with some influencers and artists to share their personal stories on the disease. 

We thought we would finish this blog post with a quote taken from one of our favourite series, Fleabag, it is a perfect description of the pain that is intrinsic to our lives. 

Women are born with pain built in,” she says. “It’s our physical destiny: period pains, sore boobs, childbirth, you know. We carry it within ourselves throughout our lives, men don’t.

“They have to seek it out, they invent all these gods and demons and things just so they can feel guilty about things, which is something we do very well on our own. And then they create wars so they can feel things and touch each other and when there aren’t any wars they can play rugby.

“We have it all going on in here inside, we have pain on a cycle for years and years and years and then just when you feel you are making peace with it all, what happens? The menopause comes, the f***ing menopause comes, and it is the most wonderful f***ing thing in the world.

“And yes, your entire pelvic floor crumbles and you get f***ing hot and no one cares, but then you’re free, no longer a slave, no longer a machine with parts. You’re just a person.”

Images - Ellie Kammer