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December 10,2020

by Grace Banks

On Read with Tati Cotilar

Tati Cotilar reflects on the 2020 that left us all on read.

I was in a very “fashion moment” at the beginning of the pandemic. I remember that I was in Milan for fashion week. And it was a Friday night, I was sitting in a bar with some friends having a drink. And a friend of ours was reading the news from their phone. And they were like, “Oh, my God, Corona a arrivato a Milano”. First you were scared of getting it, then passing it to the others and giving it to old people. And then it was more also the worry for life, the world stopping. What are we going to do? I remember it was a Sunday. I remember it perfectly. 

This year, I think that the industry itself was trying to accommodate the change. It’s the same as how human beings adapt, right? But a lot of people were really put out of place because they only knew how to work. People found themselves in a very uncomfortable spot because they were not able to do what probably was taking  99% of their time, which is work. And that was the most important thing for me coming out of lockdown, my priorities of what I wanted to do with my life shifted. My feelings about fashion changed. I thought: okay, this is not the time to try to push it, but just to let it go and release. That's how I felt.

This year has made everyone realise what's essential and what's not. So in terms of work, that’s meant asking myself, do I really need to call in a million pairs of different types of shoes and tops? All these things that I used to do and took for granted. In terms of how the fashion industry is working, well, I became a little bit more critical about the overproduction of things. The industry was producing so many seasons every year, and so much production of clothing every year. People were addicted to consumption. And in my case, I realised I don't need to buy clothes anymore. I just don't need it. And I think that it was a big breaking point for a lot of people, you don't need to produce that much, you don’t need to buy that much. Obviously fashion is a luxury industry and it's not essential, but it also makes you feel good. So it's all about finding a good balance, I think. 

I didn't feel sad or lonely in lockdown. I was having a great time being on my own. I was living alone at the time and I loved it. I loved being my own boss, having my own time, doing whatever I wanted. And that definitely gave me some satisfaction. And obviously, I miss being with my friends and interacting with them. But the fact that we're all digitally connected right now helped a lot. Whenever I would have a down moment, I would always turn to my friends and start a conversation. In general I'm very used to speaking about my emotions, what's happening and listening to others as well. And I think that was very important for me, being able to connect with friends from Argentina or friends in Europe and the States. I think being able to exchange long conversations with my friends really helped me out to go through it, the sense of community that we're all going through the same things together. 

Weirdly enough, I got really into one of my previous hobbies which is watching 1990s pop culture from Argentina, like TV shows and things like that, like soap operas and weird things. I mean, I love pop culture. And Paquita from the Netlfix series Paquita Salas, god bless her. She was the biggest source of laughs during the whole pandemic!

The main characteristic of Buffalo Zine is that every issue is completely different to the one before. It changes the layout, it changes the theme, the material, the paper, the font, the logo, everything. When I met Adrian and we talked about Buffalo, I loved that it had a good sense of irony and a sense of humour about fashion. I've been in the fashion industry for more than 12 years. I used to work as a model many years ago and then I switched to styling and I remember that through all my years in fashion people took it so seriously! They were dying for fashion. Like this is life or death. Everyone was so angry all the time, with that kind of 1990s sort of diva stress. I remember that I opened Buffalo and I was like “oh my god they are totally taking the piss out of themselves”, and I loved it.

When I was younger there weren’t any publications doing what Buffalo is doing now. And I think the response would have been different back then because it was after the 2008 crisis, people responded by completely shutting down and becoming as safe as possible. And I think that the opposite has happened with this crisis. It has touched the mind of people and made them rethink what they want in life. So I think that in a way, people have adapted really well to the fact that okay, you know, the world might end tomorrow. Let's have fun with it.

Tati Cotliar is Fashion Director at Buffalo Zine.

Watch the full IGTV interview here.

TatiCotliar JournalPortraitTatiCotliar Journal Quote

December 10,2020

by Grace Banks

On Read with Tati Cotilar

Tati Cotilar reflects on the 2020 that left us all on read.

I was in a very “fashion moment” at the beginning of the pandemic. I remember that I was in Milan for fashion week. And it was a Friday night, I was sitting in a bar with some friends having a drink. And a friend of ours was reading the news from their phone. And they were like, “Oh, my God, Corona a arrivato a Milano”. First you were scared of getting it, then passing it to the others and giving it to old people. And then it was more also the worry for life, the world stopping. What are we going to do? I remember it was a Sunday. I remember it perfectly. 

This year, I think that the industry itself was trying to accommodate the change. It’s the same as how human beings adapt, right? But a lot of people were really put out of place because they only knew how to work. People found themselves in a very uncomfortable spot because they were not able to do what probably was taking  99% of their time, which is work. And that was the most important thing for me coming out of lockdown, my priorities of what I wanted to do with my life shifted. My feelings about fashion changed. I thought: okay, this is not the time to try to push it, but just to let it go and release. That's how I felt.

This year has made everyone realise what's essential and what's not. So in terms of work, that’s meant asking myself, do I really need to call in a million pairs of different types of shoes and tops? All these things that I used to do and took for granted. In terms of how the fashion industry is working, well, I became a little bit more critical about the overproduction of things. The industry was producing so many seasons every year, and so much production of clothing every year. People were addicted to consumption. And in my case, I realised I don't need to buy clothes anymore. I just don't need it. And I think that it was a big breaking point for a lot of people, you don't need to produce that much, you don’t need to buy that much. Obviously fashion is a luxury industry and it's not essential, but it also makes you feel good. So it's all about finding a good balance, I think. 

I didn't feel sad or lonely in lockdown. I was having a great time being on my own. I was living alone at the time and I loved it. I loved being my own boss, having my own time, doing whatever I wanted. And that definitely gave me some satisfaction. And obviously, I miss being with my friends and interacting with them. But the fact that we're all digitally connected right now helped a lot. Whenever I would have a down moment, I would always turn to my friends and start a conversation. In general I'm very used to speaking about my emotions, what's happening and listening to others as well. And I think that was very important for me, being able to connect with friends from Argentina or friends in Europe and the States. I think being able to exchange long conversations with my friends really helped me out to go through it, the sense of community that we're all going through the same things together. 

Weirdly enough, I got really into one of my previous hobbies which is watching 1990s pop culture from Argentina, like TV shows and things like that, like soap operas and weird things. I mean, I love pop culture. And Paquita from the Netlfix series Paquita Salas, god bless her. She was the biggest source of laughs during the whole pandemic!

The main characteristic of Buffalo Zine is that every issue is completely different to the one before. It changes the layout, it changes the theme, the material, the paper, the font, the logo, everything. When I met Adrian and we talked about Buffalo, I loved that it had a good sense of irony and a sense of humour about fashion. I've been in the fashion industry for more than 12 years. I used to work as a model many years ago and then I switched to styling and I remember that through all my years in fashion people took it so seriously! They were dying for fashion. Like this is life or death. Everyone was so angry all the time, with that kind of 1990s sort of diva stress. I remember that I opened Buffalo and I was like “oh my god they are totally taking the piss out of themselves”, and I loved it.

When I was younger there weren’t any publications doing what Buffalo is doing now. And I think the response would have been different back then because it was after the 2008 crisis, people responded by completely shutting down and becoming as safe as possible. And I think that the opposite has happened with this crisis. It has touched the mind of people and made them rethink what they want in life. So I think that in a way, people have adapted really well to the fact that okay, you know, the world might end tomorrow. Let's have fun with it.

Tati Cotliar is Fashion Director at Buffalo Zine.

Watch the full IGTV interview here.

TatiCotliar JournalPortraitTatiCotliar Journal Quote